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    Posts Tagged economy


    Book Review: China’s Superbank: Debt, Oil and Influence – How CDB is Rewriting the Rules of Finance

    Most of the prevailing wisdom about China declares that its economic success is due to a combination of government policy and foreign direct investment. This book, China’s Superbank:Debt Oil and Influence – How China Development Bank is Rewriting the Rules of Finance, goes quite a bit further in lifting the fog behind China’s success first domestically, and now, internationally.

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    Book Review: China Fast Forward

    Bill Dodson’s China Fast Forward takes a close look at China economic and political landscape as it faces the challenges of the next decade.

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    Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962

    Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958-1962
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    The much-anticipated definitive account of China’s Great Famine  An estimated thirty-six million Chinese men, women, and children starved to death during China’s Great Leap Forward in the late 1950s and early ’60s. One of the greatest tragedies of the twentieth century, the famine is poorly understood, and in China is still euphemistically referred to as “the three years of natural disaster.” As a journalist with privileged access to official and unofficial sources, Yang Jisheng spent twenty years piecing together the events that led to mass nationwide starvation, including the death of his own father. Finding no natural causes, Yang attributes responsibility….

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    China Patents: When Top Down Doesn’t Work Anymore

    Selling IP and patents successfully in China requires an on the ground presence and some patience. Make sure that you know what you are doing.

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    Chinese Companies Going Out, And The New Patent Wars

    For the past five years, the Chinese government has been encouraging Chinese companies to set up a foreign presence. In Chinese, this policy is known as 走出去 or “going out”. There are several reasons for this: Chinese companies are predominantly low on the value chain, and are mainly in manufacturing. There is comparatively little value [...]

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    Book Review: No Ancient Wisdom, No Followers

    “No Ancient Wisdom, No Followers” by James McGregor takes a realistic look at doing business in China in 2012. Highly recommended.

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    The Trouble With China’s Official Urbanization Rate

    China’s urbanization rate is not nearly as high as officially claimed.

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    US, China CO2 Emissions Compared

    China’s CO2 emissions are already higher than the US, Canada combined, and are likely to grow even faster.

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    Internet Crackdowns As An Economic Performance Indicator

    Freedom of speech on the Internet is taken for granted in good times, but when times get touch and there is high unemployment, it becomes a different story. Then, government crackdowns become a good indicator of what is really happening in the economy.

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    How US Investment Banking Excesses Helped China’s State Sector

    When the banking crisis broke in September 2008, the global economy went into shock and nearly collapsed. The Chinese government was widely seen as being the most proactive in reacting to the crisis, injecting more than US$570 billion into the Chinese economy. Because China’s four leading banks are all state-owned, all of this money quickly [...]

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