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Quality Fade: American or Chinese, Which is Worse?

Paul Midler is an experienced sourcing expert who has worked in China for many years, and publishes The China Game blog. I believe that he is the first person to coin the term “quality fade”. Quality fade is, according to this article published in Forbes:

This is the deliberate and secret habit of widening profit margins through a reduction in the quality of materials. Importers usually never notice what’s happening; downward changes are subtle but progressive. The initial production sample is fine, but with each successive production run, a bit more of the necessary inputs are missing.

It seems a long time ago, but last year, a great deal of ink was devoted to covering the issue of defective products from China. In some cases, lives were lost in the US.

If I have one criticism of Paul Midler’s criticism of this very real problem, it is the impression it gives that somehow unscrupulous Chinese exporters are deliberately seeking to cheat and harm Americans, when in fact, many more Chinese have been injured and even killed by defective products coming out of Chinese factories. It’s just that the US media does not pick up these stories because the victims are, well, Chinese.

But if we are going to be fair about this problem, then shouldn’t we talk about the Chinese and other non-American victims of this problem as well? I think so.

Now, when it comes to the credit bubble problem, the issue of quality fade becomes even more interesting. This time, the culprit is not Chinese, but American. For a problem of such immense proportions, which is getting bigger and bigger by the day, amazingly, no one has identified the human culprits responsible for the bad decisions. But then, accountability never been a strong point for this US administration.

In China, when there was a problem with deaths caused by tainted drugs, the head of the Chinese Food and Drug Administration was sentenced to death and executed. No one yet knows the size of the credit bubble, but I have heard numbers from $15 billion to $45 billion bandied about. Mind you, the US economy is a US$12 trillion a year economy, so we are basically talking about anywhere from 1 year to four years of economic output disappearing.

Americans are losing their jobs, many are losing their homes, and the Fed has been scared into a series of panic interest rate cuts and into subsidizing the purchase of Bear Stearns by JP Morgan Chase and offering a Fed-backed unlimited credit lending facility to US investment banks.

In this article from The Washington Note, Steve Clemons talks about how the US exported poisoned financial products.

So, while Chinese factories have on occasion exported defective products, the US has exported defective financial products. And the US government participated because Treasury sold T-bills which were backed by these defective financial instruments.

Hmmm….

Now, back to quality fade. Let’s see if we can modify his definition of quality fade to capture the credit bubble situation:

This is the deliberate and secret habit of creating the illusion of increased purchasing power through the creation of fiat credit derivatives of dubious value. Exporters usually never notice what’s happening; downward changes are subtle but progressive. The initial credit derivatives are fine, but with each passing year, lose their value as more credit derivatives are created until there is a gradual collapse and new currencies and trading rules have to be established.

(The italics are where I have made changes to Paul Midler’s original text.)

When it comes to quality fade, the Americans have been wholesalers, while the Chinese are just occasional retailers.




9 Responses to “Quality Fade: American or Chinese, Which is Worse?”

  1. [...] Heatherâ??s Blog – Blog about financing, house, mortgage, loan and real estate wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt Paul Midler is an experienced sourcing expert who has worked in China for many years, and publishes The China Game blog. I believe that he is the first person to coin the term “quality fade”. Quality fade is, according to this article published in Forbes: This is the deliberate and secret habit of widening profit margins through a reduction in the quality of materials. Importers usually never notice what’s happening; downward changes are subtle but progressive. The initial production sample i [...]

  2. Tim says:

    I doubt the quality of goods you can obtain from China has ever changed. It’s always been the same sine time immemorial. However, the stuff you get from the States, like Walmart, etc., you really have to be careful. You should always figure out the source of the goods before you buy them. I always check the “Made in…” label, and see where the parts came from.

  3. Tim says:

    But if we are going to be fair about this problem, then shouldn’t Chinese media talk about the American and other non-Chinese victims of this problem as well? Just because those are not Chinese doesn’t mean they don’t have any rights, or, can be cheated at will.

  4. corbett says:

    Quality Fade
    A 3q2u Production
    A John Woo Film

    Starring: Denzel Washington, Tony Leung, Maggie Q, and Clint Eastwood

    In the wake of the devastating US financial crisis, the Chinese government steps in and buys all of Wall Street for 1.4 trillion in cash. Hu Jin Tao (Tony Leung) is now head of the US Treasury, and battles with the newly elected President (Denzel Washington) over who should be blamed and shot for causing the crisis. Hu’s mistress, Maggie Q, seduces the President, leading to his resignation, and the hard boiled war veteran (Clint Eastwood) is appointed to now save the country.

  5. [...] Denlinger posted a an article on his blog this month about that gave me a perspective on the subprime mess I hadn’t thought of before. “So, [...]

  6. Mark Forman says:

    Ahh so Americans are better salesmen. US ecomomics/national destiny has all been going off course ever since Wall Street became more influential and CEO’s partnered up for their golden parachutes. Most companies focused on officer’s getting cashed out and conning share holders in the short term, not committed to building their businesses. Oh well another day another dollar… Did I just say that?

  7. Chinese suppliers/foreign customers – sleeping in the same bed but dreaming different dreams…

    There is a great Chinese saying “sleeping in the same bed but dreaming different dreams” (tong chuang, yi meng). I find it seems to apply to so many situations ranging anywhere from causal friends to long-term business relationships. I wa…

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