acheter cialis sur la net kamagra per nachnahme cialis de 10 mg
    viagra pris apoteket viagra billig online vente cialis générique
http://www.ears.dmu.ac.uk/index.php?M=&N... kamagra without prescription http://www.ears.dmu.ac.uk/index.php?M=&N...
buy kamagra pharmacy that sell both viagra and dapoxetine buy propecia online australia
  • generico de cialis cialis generic belgique sildenafil acquisto
  • http://www.scripts.com/index.php?new=577... viagra niederlande rezeptfrei http://www.scripts.com/index.php?new=675...
    cialis piller peut on acheter du viagra en france viagra paiement par paypal france
    Twitter
    LinkedIn

    Why Globalization Will Fail

    For the past fifty years, globalization was offered as the answer to all the world’s ills: it would raise standards of living in the developing world, it would create more wealth, nations would understand each other better and eventually trust each other, and so on and so forth.

    I’m going to state what is increasingly obvious: globalization is fading in the struggle against nationalism for peoples’ hearts and minds. The world has not become global; instead capital, wealth, classes and class values, as I have mentioned in the previous post, have gone global while leaving most of the rest of the world behind. For the moneyed classes, nations are less important, perhaps even irrelevant. That is happening now as the Chinese economy grows and Chinese companies are expanding their presence to other nations by investing in their financial companies, for example.

    But the moneyed classes represent only a comparatively small percentage of the world’s population. Most belong to the middle class, who still see the world in terms of the nation-state. What do they think?

    They are becoming more, not less, nationalistic. A recent article shows that Chinese consumers are gravitating to Chinese brands, not western brands. In the online search struggle, search engines become victims of these games.

    The simple fact is that although the US and Chinese economies are tightly bound together, and depend on each other as their largest trading partners, they do not trust each other. This trust is getting wider and deeper with the passage of time; it is not getting smaller. People for the most part, still think in terms of national interests, not global interests.

    As the rich/poor divide widens, and as the US dollar weakens and the US standard of living starts to head downhill, it will become expedient to blame globalization for the country’s ills. We aren’t there yet, but we will be. Previous administrations and the WTO will be blamed for the shortcomings of globalization. Increasingly, China and the Chinese people will be seen as a threat to western values and the western way of life.

    This will make it increasingly difficult for brands to become international. Are they national? Whose side are they on? Who sits on their boards? These are questions they will be asked more and more.

    That is why globalization is failing, and will ultimately fail. It’s just that no one wants to take the blame and be the first to make the call.

    But that will happen soon enough…




    15 Responses to “Why Globalization Will Fail”

    1. [...] wrote an interesting post today on Why Globalization Will FailHere’s a quick [...]

    2. [...] today I came across a new blog, and was distressed to find out that the first post was about the impending failure of globalization. Reading other posts I discovered that the writer has some fairly nice insights into why [...]

    3. tim2 says:

      There’s a mistake –> “The simple fact is that although the US and Chinese economies are tightly bound together, and depend on each other as their largest trading partners”

      Actually Canada is USA’s largest trading partner, by a very large margin too. Check the U.S. Census Bureaus stats … http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/top/index.html

    4. China and I says:

      I mostly agree with you and I would say the world is not as flat as Thomas Friedman imagine. Remember the latest feud of the Pulitzer prize winner with a Chinese official at the Dalian World Economic Forum. I think the current globalization is due to four factors: 1/limited market expansion in Western world; so there is a need to find new territories; 2/ Economic and governement reforms in developing countries attract Foreign investors; 3/ Internet break the distance and communication; 4/ Worlwide supply chain has improved drastically (shipping lines faster and ships bigger, inland logistic improving).
      BUT, all mentioned above leads to change in our developed world. People loose their marks so they reject globalization as they loose their jobs due delocalization, more foreigners come to their country, etc…
      I don’t see this trend continue for another decade.

    5. [...] all the talk about globalization, as well as what is working and what isn’t about it, it’s time to drill down and find out what businesses are global by nature, and what [...]

    6. Anonymous says:

      “I’m not speaking in support of nationalism; however, I do think that it is a reality for most people.”

      PD

      i agree mostly with this view, but im not sure if increasing nationalism will be the solution… remember thats what led to the world wars of the past century…

    7. [...] time ago, I talked about why globalization, at least in its current form, would fail. Globalization has been oversold, especially in the US, where it was seen as leading to some [...]

    8. [...] either you are for it or against it. I have been a critic of globalization in its present form here, here and here. While a few who have commented on those articles believe that this meant I was [...]

    9. Anonymous says:

      Ultimately we are tribal creatures that find security in a the perception of a commonly held identity. This sense of common identity, which has its roots in biological principles, has effectively fostered the survival and evolution of our species and resulted in the many cultures, languages, ethnicities etc., that we now see in the world. To believe that something like globalism, that has only recently (and very tenuously) become practicable, is going to readily override the accumulated momentum of our history as a species seems almost hopelessly naive.

    10. Why is this necessary says:

      Ultimately we are tribal creatures that find security in a the perception of a commonly held identity. This sense of common identity, which has its roots in biological principles, has effectively fostered the survival and evolution of our species and resulted in the many cultures, languages, ethnicities etc., that we now see in the world. To believe that something like globalism, that has only recently (and very tenuously) become practicable, is going to readily override the accumulated momentum of our history as a species seems almost hopelessly naive.

    11. [...] need for social stability in China trumps everything else. Including commitments to globalization and the [...]

    12. [...] previous articles, I have voiced some of my criticisms and predictions re globalization here, here, here, and here. Unfortunately, it is becoming clearer by the day that globalization was [...]

    13. You are my intake , I have few web logs and rarely run out from to brand.

    14. Mistie Kysar says:

      There are some interesting points in time on this article however I don’t know if I see all of them middle to heart. There’s some validity but I will take hold opinion until I look into it further. Good article , thanks and we would like more! Added to FeedBurner as well

    15. [...] 2007, I predicted that globalization and rule of law would disappear in a heap of recrimination from all sides. As usual, my trend prediction was good, but my [...]